Neil deGrasse Tyson :)
There’s a fascinating frailty of the human mind that psychologists know all about, called “argument from ignorance.” This is how it goes. Remember what the “U” stands for in “UFO”? You see lights flashing in the sky. You’ve never seen anything like this before and don’t understand what it is. You say, “It’s a UFO!” The “U” stands for “unidentified.”
But then you say, “I don’t know what it is; it must be aliens from outer space, visiting from another planet.” The issue here is that if you don’t know what something is, your interpretation of it should stop immediately. You don’t then say it must be X or Y or Z. That’s argument from ignorance. It’s common. I’m not blaming anybody; it may relate to our burning need to manufacture answers because we feel uncomfortable about being steeped in ignorance.
Neil deGrasse Tyson, Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier (via thedragoninmygarage)

The human talent for pattern-recognition is a two-edged sword: We’re especially good at finding patterns, even when they aren’t really there — something known as false pattern-recognition.

We hunger for significance — for signs that our personal existence is of special meaning to the universe. To that end, we’re all too eager to deceive ourselves and others.

In the third episode of his fantastic Cosmos series, Neil deGrasse Tyson reminds us of how pattern-recognition both fuels our creativity and makes our minds mislead us.
(via explore-blog)
explore-blog:

Neil deGrasse Tyson talks to Wired about his new Cosmos series.
Also see Tyson on your ego and the cosmic perspective. 

Ort was also the first to correctly estimate the distance between the Sun from the center of our galaxy. That’s a big deal, finding out where we are in the Milky Way. 

hyperdrivemechanic:

Neil Degrasse Tyson - Cosmos

hyperdrivemechanic:

Neil Degrasse Tyson - Cosmos

samspratt:

More progress on my painting of Neil deGrasse Tyson.

samspratt:

More progress on my painting of Neil deGrasse Tyson.

Give a kid a book, and you change the world. In a way, even the universe.

In the third episode of his Cosmos series, Neil deGrasse Tyson echoes Carl Sagan even down to the timeless sentiment about books.

For good measure, complement with Maurice Sendak’s little-known and lovely posters on the joy of reading.

(via explore-blog)

nun-final:

Some claim that evolution is just a theory, as if it were merely an opinion.